Engineering

Future Astronaut

Posted by on November 4, 2016 at 12:01 pm

Hi Mr. Singer,

I wanted to say thank you for speaking yesterday at my first Generation WOW. After hearing you speak, I still want to be an astronaut, but definitely some type of engineer as well. I hope to some day attend maybe NYU or Duke to name two. Since I’m only in seventh grade, I’ve got some time, but I’m still continuing to do my community service, and working hard at my new school Bolles. I hope we can keep in touch since my mom is s single parent, and doesn’t make much money right now. I will definitely need scholarships. I plan to put my best foot forward, moves grades up, and read your book. FYI, I love the player vs. potential concept. I think I’m a little of both right now. Well thank you again and have a great year.

Best always,
Taylor Richardson, aka astronaut StarBright

Newly Updated Key Worldwide Brochure

Posted by on January 10, 2014 at 2:15 pm

The Key Worldwide has recently updated its capabilities and programs brochure that provides students and parents with an in-depth overview of the Key’s Complete College Program.

This service helps the student select the appropriate college with specific recommendations based on the individual’s academic and personal goals. The program works individually with students and their families to develop and implement a “game plan” complete with objectives and goals, and an understanding of how the results, if achieved, impact their ability to gain admission to the college of their choice.

You can download your free copy of the brochure by clicking here.

New Key Program Brochure Available

Posted by on August 31, 2013 at 2:49 pm

The Key Worldwide has made available a brand new brochure that provides students and parents with an in-depth overview of the Key’s Complete College Program.

This service helps the student select the appropriate college with specific recommendations based on the individual’s academic and personal goals. The program works individually with students and their families to develop and implement a “game plan” complete with objectives and goals, and an understanding of how the results, if achieved, impact their ability to gain admission to the college of their choice.

You can download your free copy of the brochure by clicking here.

Microchip Memories

Posted by on May 30, 2013 at 9:22 pm

What if your memories could be downloaded, backed up, and implanted into your brain? According to CNN, scientists from MIT, University of South Carolina, and Wake Forest and other prestigious schools, are saying that major memory rejuvenation has been achieved on test mice and other specimen. Soon this technology will make its way into curing human memory and brain degeneration.

This is not as far fetched as it seems. For the past 15 years, doctors have been able to provide brain implants to treat neurological diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson’s. According to Rob Hampson, an associate professor of pharmacology and physiology, patients’ biggest critique and fears of these procedures are placing large, electrically charged pieces of hardware in their brain. Only about 80,000 people have had procedures for these bulky implants for deep brain stimulation in the 15 years they have been available. However, scientists now believe they can replicate the brain’s process of creating long-term memories and can condense the implants to a microchip.

Scientists, such as Ted Berger, a biomedical engineering professor at the University of Southern California, have targeted the hippocampus, which is key for converting short to long-term memories. Using high level math modeling based off of the hippocampus, the scientific team has been able to create a template for how memories are converted for majority of the brain. Berger claims that soon scientists will be able to record a memory being made in an undamaged part of the brain and then use the data to predict what a “downstream” damaged area should do. The chip would replaced the damaged section provide more normal brain function.

The ultimate goal of this technology is learning more and reversing degenerative memory diseases such as Alzheimer’s or Dementia and alleviate the fears many people have by making the procedure minimally invasive. However, these types of procedures have not been as effective on advanced stages of Dementia or Alzheimer’s where multiple areas of the brain are affected simultaneously.

However, the United Kingdom’s Alzheimer’s Society and others are still optimistic about the advancements. The U.S. military is excited to incorporate this type of technology with the many brain injuries soldiers face in combat. This type of technology could be available for volunteers within the next two years and can be used in hospitals as soon as five years from now. And who knows, soon people may even be able to store every event in their lives in something that could fit in the palm of their hand.

Sources:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/07/tech/brain-memory-implants-humans

Physical Therapy Without Physical Interaction

Posted by on February 26, 2013 at 6:02 am

Scientists and engineers are working together to change the entire practice of physical therapy. Scientists are now trying to perfect the art of telemedicine, or medical treatment that is conducted by a doctor without a physical interaction between doctor and patient, according to an article by ScienceDaily.com.

Whether it is regaining mobility or returning to athletic prowess, successful physical therapy can be based heavily on whether or not patients do their in-home exercises as prescribed by their physical therapist. Prior to new innovations in virtual physical therapy, doctors and patients would speak to one another about the progress the patient has made with their exercises using video chat or similar mediums.

Doctors can ask patients if they did their assigned exercises, but that is the limit to their facilitation. The patient could be doing the exercises incorrectly if they are taking the initiative to complete them at all. The issue is analogous to a parent monitoring their children’s homework; the parent could only assure accurate completion if they physically checked that the child had completed their assignment. There is no accountability or feedback in a process without advancements in telemedicine.

Professors from the University of Texas Dallas Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science developed a system to address this limitation. Using a series of 3D cameras, body sensors, and haptic devices, the program creates avatars for both doctors and patients, and places them in a virtual space where they can interact.

The 3D cameras allow motion to be captured and transmitted from the home to the doctor’s office in real time, thus allowing the physician to comment on how the patient performs the exercise, ensuring it is done correctly. The body sensors provide a more lifelike image and tracking of the patient’s movements. However, the most important innovation of this new system is the implementation of haptic devices, which is breaking new ground on how patient-doctor relationships will evolve.

Haptic devices are able to send resistance, vibration, or motion from person to person. Patients feel the force of a physician massaging their muscle or therapists provide resistance exercises, which is an important tool in the physical therapists arsenal.

After speaking with Cameron Alcala, a student who recently had physical therapy for a torn labrum, I had a greater understanding of the implications of how this technology could affect the field from a patient perspective. Alcala claimed that he was a little “skeptical [of virtual therapy] because [he] enjoyed the relationship that was formed with [his] therapist.” After speaking more about the topic, Alcala added, “the virtual therapy could definitely supplement scheduled appointments”. Alcala attributed this to the fact that he has poor posture and wished that a professional could analyze his in-home exercises and place him in the right positions.

Patients now can be held accountable for doing their exercises and doing them properly. According to Dr. Balakrishnan “Prabha” Prabhakaran from UT Dallas, this technology is a massive forward and can be applied to many teacher-student interactions such as dance lessons or any type of education where a teacher and student share the same space. Realistic feedback technology could be the future for education. Now doctors can check their patients’ “homework type” exercises on a day-to-day basis without an arranged appointment in the office.
Sources: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130205143336.htm

Engineering the Future

Posted by on November 30, 2012 at 4:19 am

“America needs more engineers and scientists to maintain marketing competitiveness and keep jobs. National Lab Day reminds us that we need to start early, getting students interested and getting serious about engineering, math, and science.” — Craig Newmark, Founder of Craigslist.

The U.S. Department of Education has introduced a number of programs designed to increase the number of students entering the STEM pipeline.  Providing enough engineering graduates is essential for America to maintain its competitive edge in a global economy.  The U.S. Bureau of Labor notes that architecture and engineering occupations are projected to add 252,800 new jobs between 2010 and 2020 as they grow by 10.4 percent. Engineers are the largest com -ponent of this major occupational group and will add the most new jobs, 160,400.  Engineers receive some of the highest starting salaries starting after graduation with a B.S. degree at close to $100,000 per year.  The future remains bright for those that excel in STEM.